Ajit Kanitkar
Ajit Kanitkar is a Consultant for Tata Education and Development Trust and a Member of the research team at Centre for Development and Research in Pune. Prior to this, he was Program Officer at Ford Foundation, India office, and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, both in New Delhi. He taught at Institute of Rural Management, Anand, during 1992-1995.
June 30, 2017
Procurement of produce is in progress at a market yard. (Photo courtesy MAHAPFC)

Collective farm gate procurement offers solutions to cover price crashes

Farmer producer companies have started to play an important role in procurement from smallholders, which guards against price crashes that has been plaguing marginalized farmers across the country despite record harvests

June 28, 2017
The use of bullocks for farming is decreasing in India. (Photo by Mallika Viegas)

The unsuitable boy of India’s cattle economy

The problem of male cattle in India, the world’s largest milk-producing country, remains in limbo even as farmers grapple with latest government regulations that severely restrict cattle trade and culling

June 26, 2017
Led by village headman Krusna Kadraka and Dasara Kadraka in an earlier mission to collect lost millet varieties, the women of Kadarguma prepare to walk to their clan families in remote hamlets. (Photo by Manipadma Jena)

Millets travel from tribal farms to dinner tables

The indigenous Dongria Kondh community in Odisha is helping to restore the popularity of native varieties of millets that can grow in droughty weather conditions, even as millet products gain traction among affluent consumers for their many health benefits

June 23, 2017
Women of Nosariya village in Rajasthan at a workshop to learn the art of tie and dye. (Photo by Jigyasa Mishra)

Tie and dye add color to women’s lives in Nosariya

Learning the traditional art of coloring fabrics is enabling many women in rural Bikaner to add an additional source of household income in an area where patriarchy makes it difficult for them to step out of their villages